AFGHANISTAN 2014: BETWEEN PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS AND WESTERN TROOP WITHDRAWAL

AFGHANISTAN 2014: BETWEEN PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS AND WESTERN TROOP WITHDRAWAL

BY THOMAS RUTTIG
Afghanistan Analysts Network
(Kabul)

SATURDAY, 12 OCTOBER
14:30–15.30 / HALL #2
NEW BUILDING / KIMEP

Thomas Ruttig is a founder, co-director and senior analyst of the independent think tank Afghanistan Analysts Network (AAN) based in Kabul and Berlin.

 

 

 

 

Thomas Ruttig graduated in Afghan Studies from Humboldt University, Berlin, in 1985 and speaks both Pashto and Dari fluently. He worked and lived for more than 10 years in Afghanistan and Pakistan. After his graduation in 1985, he joined the diplomatic service of the German Democratic Republic and served at its Kabul embassy in 1988/89. In 2000, he joined the UN mission in Afghanistan (UNSMA, later UNAMA) as a political affairs officer. During that time, he worked as an advisor to the Afghan Independent Emergency Loya Jirga Commission and head of UNAMA’s Islamabad and Gardez offices, respectively. In 2003, Thomas Ruttig was appointed Deputy of the Special Representative of the European Union for Afghanistan. In 2004, he joined the German Embassy in Kabul as a political councillor, and in 2006-2008, he worked as a Visiting Fellow at the Berlin-based think tank SWP (Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik/German Institute for International and Security Affairs). Since 2008, he is an independent analyst on Afghanistan. In 2011, Thomas Ruttig was called by the Government of Afghanistan to join the Presidential Study Group to examine the topic of Radicalization in Afghan Society.

His online publications are available from the following links:
http://www.afghanistan-analysts.org/author/thomas-ruttig

BACK TO THE FUTURE: GERMANY’S AFGHANISTAN POLICY AFTER 2014

BACK TO THE FUTURE: GERMANY’S AFGHANISTAN POLICY AFTER 2014

FRIDAY, 1 MARCH
17:00–18.00 / HALL#3
NEW BUILDING

BY SEBASTIAN HARNISCH
HEIDELBERG UNIVERSITY

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sebastian Harnisch is Professor for International Relations and the Executive Director at the Institut for Political Science (Ruprecht-Karls-University of Heidelberg). His research and publications encompass German and American Foreign Policy, European affairs, theories of International Relations, non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and Korean Affairs. His last major theoretical work is Role Theory in International Relations. Contemporary Approaches and Analyses, co-edited with C. Frank and H. Maull (New York: Routledge, 2011).

CENTRAL ASIA AND AFGHANISTAN IN AN EVOLVING REGIONAL ORDER [INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE]

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE
9-11 September 2012

“CENTRAL ASIA AND AFGHANISTAN
IN AN EVOLVING REGIONAL ORDER”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A conference titled “Central Asia and Afghanistan in an Evolving Regional Order” was hosted by the Central Asian Studies Center (CASC), in cooperation with the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) funded by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Sweden and the Robert Bosch Stiftung, between September 9-11, 2012 at KIMEP University. The event attracted more than twenty international scholars and researchers from Central Asian states, Russia, China and Europe.

 

During the two days of the research conference, the participants discussed in details the future of Afghanistan with a special focus on the Central Asian involvement in the project. After the opening session by Alessandro Frigerio (KIMEP) and Neil Melvin (SIPRI), the first panel discussion was devoted to the current realities in Afghanistan. After the presentations, a heated debate ensued on whether the current American approach is the right one and whether the withdrawal in 2014 will solve more problems than it creates.

 

The following panels were devoted to the different main actors involved in the region. First, the role of the United States of America and the western powers were discussed. In the first afternoon session, presentation and discussion topics included the role of the Russian Federation and the People’s Republic of China, as the main regional powers in Central Asia and Afghanistan. Vadim Kozyulin from the Russian PIR-Centre and Farhod Tolipov an independent expert from Uzbekistan, with Nargis Kassenova as moderator, presented their opinions about the future of the region. The main concerns for Russia are the imminent security threat coming from the neighboring region, the issues of drug trafficking and instability spillovers. The Chinese perspective was explained by Wang Xu from Beijing University, China and Adil Kaukenov from the Agency for Investments Profitability Investigation, Astana, Kazakhstan.

 

The second day of the conference was completely reserved for the discussion on the role of Central Asia in Afghanistan. There is an increasing realization of the importance of Central Asian states included in the current approaches focusing on the future of Afghanistan. The participants from Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan and Russia highlighted the importance of regional cooperation in order to solve not only the physical security threats but to connect the countries in the region to create a prospering future in economic, social and political sense.

By Laura Cseke
CASC Coordinator

 

THE WAR IN AFGHANISTAN AND ITS IMPACT ON CENTRAL ASIA

THE WAR IN AFGHANISTAN AND ITS IMPACT ON CENTRAL ASIA

MONDAY, 4 APRIL
16:00–17.00 / HALL#2
NEW BUILDING

BY ESADULLAH OGUZ
NEWSWEEK TURKEY
Central Asia and Afghanistan Correspondent