RECENT ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENTS IN THE CAUCASUS AND CENTRAL ASIA REGION

TUESDAY, 19 MAY
15:00–16:00 / HALL #237
VALIKHANOV BLD / KIMEP

By JUHA KÄHKÖNEN
Deputy Director
Middle East & Central Asia Department
International Monetary Fund (IMF)

The IMF releases its Regional Economic Outlook (REO) in the spring and fall of every year. In its latest update in April 2015, it analysed the impact of the fall in oil prices, the economic slowdown in Russia and developments in exchange rates in the Caucasus and Central Asia region. In this lecture Mr. Kähkönen will share his understanding of economic developments in the region.

Short biography of the speaker:

Mr. Juha Kahkonen is deputy director of Middle East and Central Asia Department, IMF, since March 2012. Oversees the department’s work on Egypt and the CCA (Caucasus and Central Asia) Mr. Juha Kahkonen has Ph.D. from Michigan (1982).

Mr. Juha Kahkonen has previously worked in the Research, Asian, Policy Development and Review, and European Departments. Past assignments include period as resident representative in India, work on advanced and emerging market countries in Asia (Japan, Singapore, Poland, and Thailand), heading IMF missions to Albania, Bulgaria, Turkey, and more recently Germany and Russia, and reviewing IMF work on some 50 countries representing all continents.
Prior to joining the IMF, in 1982–86, Mr. Juha Kahkonen worked as assistant professor at New York University, associate professor and professor at Helsinki School of Economics, and research advisor at the Bank of Finland.

THE EUROPEAN UNION AS A DEMOCRATIZING ACTOR IN EASTERN EUROPE AND CENTRAL ASIA: WHAT HAS BEEN DONE AND WHAT WENT WRONG?

THURSDAY,  16 OCTOBER
17:30–18:30 / HALL #2
NEW BUILDING / KIMEP

By Vera Axyonova
Fulda University (Germany)

The European Union (EU) is commonly seen among the world’s leading democratizers. Over the past decades, the EU has developed a range of foreign policy instruments to promote democracy and human rights beyond its borders. However, the success of its democratization efforts remains questionable in the countries that lack the EU membership perspective. The present talk will shed the light on the functioning of the EU democratization policy, comparing its efforts across a range of post-communist states in Eastern Europe and Central Asia.

Vera Axyonova is researcher at the Centre for Intercultural and European Studies, Fulda University of Applied Sciences, Germany, and associate researcher with Europe-Central Asia Monitoring program. She has received her PhD in Political Science from the University of Bremen and currently pursues several projects in the field of security and democratization studies.

 

 

NATO’S ENGAGEMENT WITH KAZAKHSTAN AND CENTRAL ASIA: POST-SUMMIT, POST-ISAF

THURSDAY, 9 OCTOBER
17:00–18:00 / HALL #237
VALIKHANOV BUILDING / KIMEP

1. “NATO’s engagement with Partners in Central Asia” by ALEXANDER VINNIKOV
(NATO Liaison Officer/Head of office, Central Asia)

2. “The results of the NATO Wales Summit and NATO’s future cooperation with Partners” by DESPINA AFENTOULI
(Programme Officer for Partnerships, Public Diplomacy Division, NATO HQ)

3. “NATO’s partnership with Kazakhstan” by TANYA HARTMAN
(Officer for Kazakhstan, Political Affairs and Security Policy Division, NATO HQ)

The speakers will present an overview of NATO’s cooperation with Kazakhstan and other partners in Central Asia, in the context of both the recent NATO Summit and the upcoming end of the ISAF mission in Afghanistan.

KAZAKHSTAN’S FOREIGN POLICY IN THE 1990s: BALANCING vs. MULTIVECTORISM

KAZAKHSTAN’S FOREIGN POLICY IN THE 1990s:
BALANCING vs. MULTIVECTORISM

By ANUAR AYAZBEKOV

University of St. Andrews, UK

WEDNESDAY, 28 MAY
17:00–18.00 / HALL #2
NEW BUILDING / KIMEP

Kazakhstan’s foreign affairs in the immediate post-independence period seems anomalous from the perspective of mainstream structural theories of IR. The alternative reading of the republic’s diplomatic history is done through the prisms of neoclassical realism and foreign policy analysis. The author uses extensive archival material to answer the question of why did the nation not balance or bandwagon with or against any of its powerful neighbours?

CHINESE ENERGY DIPLOMACY IN CENTRAL ASIA: TRENDS AND PROSPECTS

CHINESE ENERGY DIPLOMACY IN CENTRAL ASIA: TRENDS AND PROSPECTS

THURSDAY, 25 OCTOBER
16:00–17.30 / HALL#3
NEW BUILDING

BY ELZBIETA MARIA PRON
UNIVERSITY OF NOTTINGHAM
School of Contemporary Chinese Studies
OSCE Academy in Bishkek

 

 

 

 

Over the past 20 years China has acquired a position of a major partner of Central Asian energy markets. Today, China is a second largest oil importer from Kazakhstan, important player in Turkmen and Uzbek gas sector, and an investor in Tajik and Kyrgyz energy transportation.

This lecture looks at Chinese energy relationships with states in the region. It examines the geopolitical context of the energy cooperation between China and Central Asia. While the bilateral energy relations will remain the main corridor in the near future, China is actively promoting the multilateral framework of the SCO Energy Club. This shift in Chinese energy diplomacy derives from the new geopolitical conditions after 2011, its increasing domestic demands and a relative vulnerability vis-à-vis its energy partners.