AFGHANISTAN AND CENTRAL ASIA: RISKS AND OPPORTUNITIES

WEDNESDAY, 27 MAY
15:00–16:00 / HALL#237 VALIKHANOV BLD. KIMEP UNIVERSITY

By Armands Pupols
UN Regional Centre for Preventive Diplomacy for Central Asia (UNRCCA)

Armands Pupols has been working for international organizations for the last fifteen years. He started with the OSCE field offices in Bosnia and Herzegovina back in the late 90s. Afterwards he worked in the OSCE Centre in Almaty, Kazakhstan, as an Economic and Environmental Officer and Chief Administrator. He joined the Conflict Prevention Centre in the OSCE Secretariat in Vienna in 2004. Since the end of 2008 he is working as a Political Adviser in the UN Regional Centre for Preventive Diplomacy for Central Asia (UNRCCA), particularly covering issues related to the interaction between Central Asian states and Afghanistan. Regarding academic background Armands Pupols studied international relations and economy in the Latvian University, Budapest University of Economic Science and Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.

REFLECTIONS ON THE FUTURE OF AFGHANISTAN, PAKISTAN AND CENTRAL ASIA

TUESDAY, 11 NOVEMBER
15:00–16:00 / HALL #237
VALIKHANOV BUILDING / KIMEP

Guest speakers:
Andrew Wilder
Vice President of South and Central Asian programs
US Institute of Peace (USIP)
Scott Smith
Director, Afghanistan and Central Asia program
US Institute of Peace (USIP)
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Andrew Wilder is the vice president of South & Central Asia programs. He joined USIP in August 2010 as the director of Afghanistan and Pakistan Programs. Prior to joining the Institute, he served as research director for politics and policy at the Feinstein International Center at Tufts University. Previously, Wilder served as founder and director of Afghanistan’s first independent policy research institution, the Kabul-based Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit (AREU). This was preceded by more than 10 years managing humanitarian and development programs in Pakistan and Afghanistan, including with Save the Children, International Rescue Committee, and Mercy Corps International.

Wilder is the author of The Pakistani Voter: Electoral Politics and Voting Behaviour in the Punjab (Oxford University Press, 1999), and has written numerous other publications. He has conducted extensive research exploring issues relating to state-building, development and stabilization efforts in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Recent research has focused on electoral politics in Afghanistan, and the effectiveness of aid in promoting stabilization objectives in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Wilder holds a bachelor’s degree in foreign service from Georgetown University. He also holds a master’s degree in law and diplomacy and a doctorate from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University.

 

Scott Smith is the director of USIP’s Afghanistan & Central Asia program. Prior to joining USIP in April 2012, Smith spent 13 years at the United Nations, focusing primarily on Afghanistan and democratization issues. He served as the senior special assistant to the special representative of the secretary-general in Kabul from January 2009 to August 2010. From June 2007 to January 2009, he served as a senior political affairs officer and team leader for Afghanistan in the department of peacekeeping operations. As the desk officer for the 2004 Afghan presidential elections in the U.N.’s Electoral Assistance Division, Smith oversaw the planning, establishment and financing of the U.N. electoral team in Afghanistan. Prior to 2004, Smith held several political affairs officer positions, including as the Afghanistan desk officer from 2002-2003 and as the political adviser to the United Nations Political Office in Bougainville, Papua New Guinea.

He first started working in Afghanistan in 1994-1995 with a French humanitarian organization, Solidarités. Smith is the author of  Afghanistan’s Troubled Transition: Politics, Peacekeeping and the 2004 Presidential Election, as well as a number of articles and book chapters. He is an adjunct professor at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs.

Smith holds a bachelor of science in foreign service from Georgetown University. He also holds a master’s degree in international affairs from Columbia University, School of International and Public Affairs.

 

NATO’S ENGAGEMENT WITH KAZAKHSTAN AND CENTRAL ASIA: POST-SUMMIT, POST-ISAF

THURSDAY, 9 OCTOBER
17:00–18:00 / HALL #237
VALIKHANOV BUILDING / KIMEP

1. “NATO’s engagement with Partners in Central Asia” by ALEXANDER VINNIKOV
(NATO Liaison Officer/Head of office, Central Asia)

2. “The results of the NATO Wales Summit and NATO’s future cooperation with Partners” by DESPINA AFENTOULI
(Programme Officer for Partnerships, Public Diplomacy Division, NATO HQ)

3. “NATO’s partnership with Kazakhstan” by TANYA HARTMAN
(Officer for Kazakhstan, Political Affairs and Security Policy Division, NATO HQ)

The speakers will present an overview of NATO’s cooperation with Kazakhstan and other partners in Central Asia, in the context of both the recent NATO Summit and the upcoming end of the ISAF mission in Afghanistan.

AFGHANISTAN 2014: BETWEEN PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS AND WESTERN TROOP WITHDRAWAL

AFGHANISTAN 2014: BETWEEN PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS AND WESTERN TROOP WITHDRAWAL

BY THOMAS RUTTIG
Afghanistan Analysts Network
(Kabul)

SATURDAY, 12 OCTOBER
14:30–15.30 / HALL #2
NEW BUILDING / KIMEP

Thomas Ruttig is a founder, co-director and senior analyst of the independent think tank Afghanistan Analysts Network (AAN) based in Kabul and Berlin.

 

 

 

 

Thomas Ruttig graduated in Afghan Studies from Humboldt University, Berlin, in 1985 and speaks both Pashto and Dari fluently. He worked and lived for more than 10 years in Afghanistan and Pakistan. After his graduation in 1985, he joined the diplomatic service of the German Democratic Republic and served at its Kabul embassy in 1988/89. In 2000, he joined the UN mission in Afghanistan (UNSMA, later UNAMA) as a political affairs officer. During that time, he worked as an advisor to the Afghan Independent Emergency Loya Jirga Commission and head of UNAMA’s Islamabad and Gardez offices, respectively. In 2003, Thomas Ruttig was appointed Deputy of the Special Representative of the European Union for Afghanistan. In 2004, he joined the German Embassy in Kabul as a political councillor, and in 2006-2008, he worked as a Visiting Fellow at the Berlin-based think tank SWP (Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik/German Institute for International and Security Affairs). Since 2008, he is an independent analyst on Afghanistan. In 2011, Thomas Ruttig was called by the Government of Afghanistan to join the Presidential Study Group to examine the topic of Radicalization in Afghan Society.

His online publications are available from the following links:
http://www.afghanistan-analysts.org/author/thomas-ruttig

BACK TO THE FUTURE: GERMANY’S AFGHANISTAN POLICY AFTER 2014

BACK TO THE FUTURE: GERMANY’S AFGHANISTAN POLICY AFTER 2014

FRIDAY, 1 MARCH
17:00–18.00 / HALL#3
NEW BUILDING

BY SEBASTIAN HARNISCH
HEIDELBERG UNIVERSITY

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sebastian Harnisch is Professor for International Relations and the Executive Director at the Institut for Political Science (Ruprecht-Karls-University of Heidelberg). His research and publications encompass German and American Foreign Policy, European affairs, theories of International Relations, non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and Korean Affairs. His last major theoretical work is Role Theory in International Relations. Contemporary Approaches and Analyses, co-edited with C. Frank and H. Maull (New York: Routledge, 2011).

CENTRAL ASIA AND AFGHANISTAN IN AN EVOLVING REGIONAL ORDER [INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE]

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE
9-11 September 2012

“CENTRAL ASIA AND AFGHANISTAN
IN AN EVOLVING REGIONAL ORDER”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A conference titled “Central Asia and Afghanistan in an Evolving Regional Order” was hosted by the Central Asian Studies Center (CASC), in cooperation with the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) funded by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Sweden and the Robert Bosch Stiftung, between September 9-11, 2012 at KIMEP University. The event attracted more than twenty international scholars and researchers from Central Asian states, Russia, China and Europe.

 

During the two days of the research conference, the participants discussed in details the future of Afghanistan with a special focus on the Central Asian involvement in the project. After the opening session by Alessandro Frigerio (KIMEP) and Neil Melvin (SIPRI), the first panel discussion was devoted to the current realities in Afghanistan. After the presentations, a heated debate ensued on whether the current American approach is the right one and whether the withdrawal in 2014 will solve more problems than it creates.

 

The following panels were devoted to the different main actors involved in the region. First, the role of the United States of America and the western powers were discussed. In the first afternoon session, presentation and discussion topics included the role of the Russian Federation and the People’s Republic of China, as the main regional powers in Central Asia and Afghanistan. Vadim Kozyulin from the Russian PIR-Centre and Farhod Tolipov an independent expert from Uzbekistan, with Nargis Kassenova as moderator, presented their opinions about the future of the region. The main concerns for Russia are the imminent security threat coming from the neighboring region, the issues of drug trafficking and instability spillovers. The Chinese perspective was explained by Wang Xu from Beijing University, China and Adil Kaukenov from the Agency for Investments Profitability Investigation, Astana, Kazakhstan.

 

The second day of the conference was completely reserved for the discussion on the role of Central Asia in Afghanistan. There is an increasing realization of the importance of Central Asian states included in the current approaches focusing on the future of Afghanistan. The participants from Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan and Russia highlighted the importance of regional cooperation in order to solve not only the physical security threats but to connect the countries in the region to create a prospering future in economic, social and political sense.

By Laura Cseke
CASC Coordinator

 

THE WAR IN AFGHANISTAN AND ITS IMPACT ON CENTRAL ASIA

THE WAR IN AFGHANISTAN AND ITS IMPACT ON CENTRAL ASIA

MONDAY, 4 APRIL
16:00–17.00 / HALL#2
NEW BUILDING

BY ESADULLAH OGUZ
NEWSWEEK TURKEY
Central Asia and Afghanistan Correspondent

NATO & CENTRAL ASIA: THE ODD COUPLE

NATO & CENTRAL ASIA: THE ODD COUPLE

THURSDAY, 25 NOVEMBER
17:30–18.30 / HALL#1
NEW BUILDING

BY FITZ FITZGIBBOM
UK EMBASSY DEFENCE ATTACHE
and in country
NATO CONTACT POINT EMBASSY REPRESENTATIVE