COLLECTIVE IDENTITY AS A CATALYST FOR SECURITY COMMUNITY IN CENTRAL ASIA

COLLECTIVE IDENTITY AS A CATALYST FOR SECURITY COMMUNITY IN CENTRAL ASIA
By Dina Iglikova

FRIDAY, 26 FEBRUARY
17:00–18:00 / HALL 237
Valikhanov Building / KIMEP UNIVERSITY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The security community theory has become one of the most dominant tools in the regionalism studies. The approach to study regional integration through the prism of norms, identity and values, has increased significantly the potential to study the “missing” dimensions of regional dynamics. The theory allows seeing the regions not only from geopolitical angle, but also as socio-political constructs. Three conditions are required for a security community to emerge: collective identity, strong interstate ties, and institutions. This talk explores briefly the theory, the state of collective identity, and outlines the pressing reasons for the security community in Central Asia.

Dina Iglikova is an independent consultant for nonprofits and business. She implements projects on public diplomacy, youth, healthcare, and climate change in Central Asia. She has worked for the IOM on countering human trafficking and for the OSCE on politico-military affairs. Dina is an alumna of the OSCE Academy and holds an MA in Political Science and an MA in International Security from the University of Warwick. Her research interests include the concept of security community, collective identity, political Islam, Central Asia’s place in the globalizing world. Dina is a keen supporter and a public diplomacy activist on the issues of Central Asia’s integration across economic, political, and cultural trajectories.

Comments are closed.