BAZAARS & BORDER TRADE: THE CHANGING NATURE OF CROSS-BORDER TRADE BETWEEN CHINA & KAZAKHSTAN

BAZAARS & BORDER TRADE: THE CHANGING NATURE OF CROSS-BORDER TRADE
BETWEEN CHINA & KAZAKHSTAN

BY COBUS BLOCK
Fulbright Scholar

THURSDAY, 13 JUNE
16:00–17.00 / HALL#2
NEW BUILDING / KIMEP

COBUS BLOCK graduated from the University of Wyoming in 2012 with a B.A. in international studies. While enrolled at a the University of Wyoming, Cobus spent two years studying international politics at Zhejiang University in Hangzhou and modern Chinese literature at Capital Normal University in Beijing. During his time in China Cobus was also involved with the Frontier Program based at Kansas State University, where he researched food safety and agricultural development issues in the People’s Republic of China. Cobus’ current project focuses on trade between China and Kazakhstan with specific focus on small and medium enterprises.

 

 

 

China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region shares 5,600 km of border with eight countries: 1,700 km of which are shared with Kazakhstan. Small wonder then that the region has grown into a local trading hub. In 2010 the ratio of Xinjiang’s foreign trade value to its GDP was over 30 percent, in the same year the ratio of Xinjiang’s trade with Kazakhstan to its GDP reached 17 percent.

Kazakhstan is a natural market for Xinjiang’s products. Urumqi, the capital and economic hub of Xinjiang, sits over 3,000 km from China’s eastern coast. In contrast, only 1,000 km separate Urumqi and Almaty—the largest city in Kazakhstan. While Central Asia was a destination for only one percent of China’s total exports in 2010, it was the destination for 83 percent of exports from Xinjiang in the same year. Of the Central Asian states, Kazakhstan is by far the most important destination for exports from Xinjiang; in 2010, it accounted for 52 percent of Xinjiang’s exports.

In spite of Xinjiang’s strong presence in Kazakhstan, the Customs Union, established in 2010 by Belarus, Kazakhstan and Russia, challenged Sino-Central Asian trade relations. Most importantly, traders in Almaty and Urumqi, who had made a living bringing goods across the border suddenly found business much more difficult—the Kazakhstani customs officials, regulations and requirements were new and unfamiliar. A number of other factors in both Xinjiang and Kazakhstan have dampened the enthusiasm that once enveloped the topic.
Bilateral trade between Kazakhstan and Xinjiang has been a major factor for economic development in both, and current trends in trade may play a large role in the future of the region at large. On a broader level, this case also provides an excellent example of the prospects and challenges facing relations between China and Central Asian countries.

KAZAKHSTAN AND GLOBAL NUCLEAR POLITICS

KAZAKHSTAN AND GLOBAL NUCLEAR POLITICS

FRIDAY, 7 JUNE
18:30–20.00 / HALL#1
NEW BUILDING
KIMEP UNIVERSITY

BY DR. TOGZHAN KASSENOVA

ASSOCIATE OF THE NUCLEAR POLICY PROGRAM AT CARNEGIE ENDOWMENT FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACE. SHE IS A MEMBER OF THE UN SECRETARY-GENERAL’S ADVISORY BOARD ON DISARMAMENT MATTERS.

 

 

 

Togzhan Kassenova is an Associate in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment and a Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow. She currently works on issues related to the role of emerging powers in the global nuclear order, weapons of mass destruction nonproliferation issues, nuclear security, and strategic trade management.

Kassenova serves on the UN secretary general’s Advisory Board on Disarmament Matters.

Prior to joining the Carnegie Endowment, Kassenova worked as a senior research associate at the University of Georgia’s Center for International Trade and Security in Washington, DC, as a postdoctoral fellow at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies, and as an adjunct faculty member at the Monterey Institute of International Studies. She was previously a journalist and professor in Kazakhstan.

Kassenova is the author of From Antagonism to Partnership: The Uneasy Path of the U.S.-Russian Cooperative Threat Reduction (2007). She has published widely in scholarly and policy journals, including Nonproliferation Review, Disarmament Forum, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, and China and Eurasia Forum Quarterly.

RENATIONALIZING CITIES IN POST-SOVIET SPACE: A FOCUS ON LANGUAGE

RENATIONALIZING CITIES IN POST-SOVIET SPACE: A FOCUS ON LANGUAGE

WEDNESDAY, 5 JUNE
16:00–17.00 / HALL#3
VALIKHANOV BUILDING

BY DR. HELEN FALLER
Fulbright Scholar

Dr. Helen Faller is the founder of the Mosaiqa and the author of Nation, Language, Islam: Tatarstan’s Sovereignty Movement (CEU Press: 2011).